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Law and Society Week Film Festival

Page history last edited by dfreeman@... 12 years, 7 months ago

Monday 12noon - 1:20

LAW & SOCIETY FILM FESTIVAL - RP D. Sukol

Moderator: Dena Sukol, Esq., Visiting Lecturer 

SENTENCED HOME (76 mins.)  The film focuses on how our anti-terrorism laws have changed and the harsh effects they have had on immigrants. Loeun Lun, was admitted to the U.S. as part of a large group of refugees from Cambodia in the 1980’s.    As a “permanent resident,” the refugees were not afforded the same protections as American citizens. Under strict anti-terrorism legislation enacted in 1996, even minor convictions can result in automatic deportation.  The case of Loeun Lun who fired a gun in the air as a teenager to protect himself from a gang attack is explored as he faces deportation many years later. 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 11am - 12:20pm

LAW & SOCIETY FILM FESTIVAL - RP D. Sukol

Moderators:  Lisa Handler, Ph.D., Asst. Professor and Dena Sukol, Esq., Visiting Lecturer 

TROOP 1500 is a film about a very special Girl Scout troop that brings mothers who are serving time for serious crimes together with their daughters on the outside.  Facing long sentences from the courts, the mothers struggle to mend their fractured relationships with their daughters.  The film follows five young girls whose mothers are serving time at Hilltop Prison in Gatesville, Texas.  The filmmakers trained the girls in videography so that they could conduct their own interviews and tell their own stories -- asking hard questions and getting tough answers.  A sobering but hopeful look at the struggles faced by the more than 2 million American children who have a parent behind bars. 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday 3:30 - 4:50

LAW & SOCIETY FILM FESTIVAL- RP D. Sukol

Moderators:  Lisa Handler, Ph.D.,Asst. Professor and Dena Sukol, Esq., Visiting Lecturer

THE CHILDREN’S MARCH.  It was 1963 and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was attempting to end segregation in the city of Birmingham, Alabama, but the African American adults knew that if they took part in any demonstrations, they would lose their jobs.  King was unable to get anyone to march with him until……………..This film tells the story of how the young people of Birmingham, Alabama braved fire hoses and police dogs in 1963 and brought segregation to its knees. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wed, 9am - 10am  (WERC Campus) -

LAW & SOCIETY FILM FESTIVAL- RP D. Sukol

Moderator:  Jane Jacobs, Esq.

film to be announced 

 

 

 

 

 

Wed. 10am - Noon

LAW & SOCIETY FILM FESTIVAL - RP D. Sukol

Moderator:  Dena Sukol, Esq., Visiting Lecturer

RACE TO EXECUTION (2005 54 MINS.)  Race discrimination infects America’s capital punishment system. According to a landmark study regarding race and the death penalty, a black defendant who kills a white victim is up to 30 times more likely to be sentenced to death than a white defendant who kills a black victim. The film traces the fates of two death row inmates, in Russell County, Alabama and Chicago, Illinois. Their compelling personal stories are enlarged and enriched by attorneys who fought for these men’s lives, and by prosecutors, criminal justice scholars and experts in the fields of law and the media.

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